The average grocery store tomato often presents a trade off: you may get a nice …


The average grocery store tomato often presents a trade off: you may get a nice firm tomato that is however watery and flavourless from its time in cold storage. On the other hand, you might spy the juiciest-looking red tomato on the shelf—only to discover when you pick it up that its soft flesh is festooned with unappetising bruises. ⠀

Now researchers may have found a solution that tackles both these problems: they’ve discovered a gene that allows tomatoes to ripen, but keeps their flesh firm for longer to protect against spoilage. This could be a boon not just for picky consumers, but for tackling food waste—especially if their discovery is applied to other fruits that share the tomato’s fate. ⠀

Tomatoes are some of the most widely-consumed fruits globally, and “the most valuable fruit crop worldwide in terms of total production value,” explains James Giovannoni. Their new discovery not only keeps damage-prone fruit out of the landfills, it also requires less energy-guzzling infrastructure for storage and cooling.



Source

Author: Academy for Liberty Deutschland

1 thought on “The average grocery store tomato often presents a trade off: you may get a nice …

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